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-- american citizens take government officials who nor this reality when they pushed their foreign-policy agendas based on this. guest: thank you for your question and i disagree with your premise, which is that the world trade center was an inside job with explosives. there are the studies out there and it is pretty clear that the -- those buildings were attacked by planes that were hijacked by al qaeda operatives. i know there is a continuing conspiracy theory community out there that think this was some sort of nefarious scheme to -- it is hard to take of things seriously. i know you may genuinely believe it but i encourage you to go out there and engage in debates. i don't think the conspiracy theory holds any water. host: maurice from ohio, democrat's line. i have a question about -- let's sayear tomorrow they have a nuclear bomb. whatd of want to know would be the consequence, what the world would do about it as compared to pakistan having a nuclear bone, india having a nuclear bomb. what will the u.s. or the rest of the world do if iran says they have a nuclear bomb today? that is
and economic assistance. other tools of former -- foreign policy. the state department budget is puny in comparison to the defense budget. you get an awful lot of benefit from some of those investments that the state department, in terms of assistance, economic assistance and it is that part of the category of the budget where we have had a lot less success in getting bipartisan support. moree senate, we have bipartisan support for that. lindsey graham, john mccain, they have been big supporters of a robust state department budget. house, some of our colleagues on the republican -- broadlyially defined as the tea party folks, it has been difficult trying to convince them of the important national security arguments in favor of that form of assistance. this is a constant back-and- forth. if you look at the house republican budget over the ten- year period, it would cut the category of the budget for those kind of state department operations. we going to have to work together to try and prevent it. if you want to do the kinds of things that mike rogers wants to do and i agree with most
have tried to be supportive. there have been various foreign- policy initiatives that i have not attacked him and try to be supportive of him on. on the drug issues, it has taken him a while, but he is now doing something about some of the minimums.bill in -- on infrastructure, there is a way that infrastructure only for the trip across america, we could have more infrastructure money is all the money earned overseas by american corporations, nearly $2 trillion from it could be brought home. andit at five % -- at 5%, probably hundreds of billions of dollars in money comes home, but justin tax revenue, at 5%, you would doubled the money we have available for infrastructure and if we could just tax it at 5%. win-win solution. we lowered the tax rate. we get more revenue and we build some roads. and i talked to the president about that, and the president cbo score is a loss of revenue because it is not coming in at 35%. 0% is coming home. we have to overcome the cbo score on this. i said, that's vote to overturn -- let's vote to overturn all the other roles, let's vote to overtu
. >> interestingly, on the political front, we know of course that the eu foreign policy chief, katherine ashton is due to arrive on tuesday. what doo does this signify? >> authorities show their strength on monday. but it is ahead of the possibility at least of further negotiation. and coincidentally, we heard the president yanukovych who, of course, these protestors want out and new elections taking place, has offered the possibility of talks. the opposition initially have said, we're not prepared to talk. when we're hemmed in by your riot police. but i think with katherine ashton's arrival, there is a possibility, at least account, that the -- at least, that the warg factions in this dispute might move towards talking to each other. that will certainly be her aim. and it's also, i think, although one can never be sure about these things, that while she is here, perhaps the authorities will not move against the protestors who are still camped out here, as we were saying, and also occupying city hall. >> they are camped out in what are freezing conditions. it's been snowing there for most of th
of the agenda at their own national security foreign policy interest. if this is good for russia, they will be at the table. that is a double edged sword. it can be a great way to solve some problems across the middle east, but we need to be extremely cautious of setting the table but so any agreement or arrangement with the russians also protects u.s., our allies interests in the region as well. the assad -- if you look at the tenets of the chemical agreement, great we got some chemical weapons off, but the russians cleaned up on us on exactly what they got in that particular field. and because of that we alienated our allies in the region. that is an important component. i am for getting that deal, but we are paying a price for that deal, but not only including the allies in negotiating that deal. >> let's consider this conversation on syria. we you were a sponsor in the summer of the free syria act, a bill to provide arms and support to the syrian rebels. when we interviewed the representative, he said he was pleased to have your co- sponsorship of the bill, a bipartisan effor
of for the should he fire someone? on foreign policy, a tweet -- he will be up on capitol hill to testify about that. there are headlines about that deal. the financial times this morning. is in chinasident and has met with japanese leaders as well. dianne feinstein and robert --endez vice president biden meeting on with asian leaders. we are talking about it somebody be fired over its failures? pennsylvania. republican. caller: good morning. i feel that the obama care fiasco has been ruining many people. my son, for instance. 62 years old -- he signed up for security and about two days later he got a letter that he had no more insurance. this is wrong. it is happening to everybody. the insurance companies must be relishing this problem. i think he is wrong and they do that he talks on both sides of his mouth. he tells us one thing and he knows he is going to do something else. i think he has been so unfair to a lot of the american public. i don't think he knows the constitution -- he does not believe in it. i am just so sorry for my son and my other children. i
necessary for our folks. >> did you have a question? >> thank you. i am a fellow at the foreign policy institute here at sais. you mentioned one common interest the united states has with russia and syria is to prevent syria from becoming a base of operations for al qaeda. once we start changing the border regime in that part of the world, we are in for changes that will have many repercussions. my question is as follows -- do you foresee in the medium-term, scenario where we see assad staying in power as being instrumental in that we share with the russians. > i think the american position, which i support, has been that you had, in syria, at he beginning of the arab spring, a movement that represented the aspirations of the majority of the syrian people across the secretary and lines for more openness and hange. the assad regime is a brutal regime that suppresses the rights of the people. e need to change the regime in syria. the challenge has been -- from our perspective we think be syrian the people deserve a government, one that represents their aspirations. we need to make sure t
the significant nature of the shift in american foreign policy that we are seeing laid out before us . i would be honored to recognize my colleague and friend, the gentleman from california, mr. sherman. mr. sherman: i thank the gentleman for yielding. the political pund its are focused on -- pund its, are focused on was this a good deal or a bad deal. we aren't here to give a grade to the administration. we are here in congress to decide what legislation should be passed. congress is a policy-making body, although so often those in the administration think that we are, at most, advisers or critics. but let's take a look at this deal and we'll see that what we get out of it is at least overstated by its proponents. because we are told that this halts their enrichment of uranium. it is true that it limits their 20% uranium. and iran will not be making progress during the six-month period of this deal toward its first bomb. but they will be making very substantial progress toward their eighth, ninth and tenth bomb and iran is not a nuclear power until they have some to hide, one to two to test.
from georgetown university, was a chief foreign policy adviser for the majority leader of the senate, senator daschle, that's were i met den denis. then the deputy national street adviser in the white house and the chief of staff for the president of the united states. please welcome denis mcdonough. [applause] >> angood morning and let me sa, let me say thanks to georgetown university and arent fox from this form on the affordable care act. let me say thanks to the great sin of the northern flank, senator dorgan answered daschle. senator daschle has been a very important mentor to me for the opportunity to be here. senator bennet, good to see you again as well. i appreciate the opportunity to talk about the affordable care act, what it's done and what it will do. and i want to update you this point on the progress we've made on fixing the website, affordable before talk about the law and its benefits, let me just take about to visit i made to the emergency room on a friday night recently. with one of my boys after he broke his left arm. they care was excellent, as
approach to foreign policy. netanyahu has said recently, rouhani has an iron fist sheathed by a velvet glove. rouhani was a nuclear negotiator, and he even bragged that he had used at the cover to advance iran's nuclear efforts. while he may be president, he is not the supreme leader, which is khamenei. the guy who at the end of the day really controls the shots is ali khamenei. rouhani was chosen by a special, very small group that khamenei had picked. they chose acceptable candidates within a narrow band of political thought. i think people do, people i work with look forward to the day when people in iran have a genuine choice between alternatives politically, but they are a long way from it. to your point, in terms of how much wiggle room rouhani has, the iranians have two big goals. >> you can watch the rest of this online at the c-span video library. we will move onto the willard hotel for remarks by secretary of state on kerry at the brookings institution save and -- brookingsisrael forum onon save anban u.s.-israel relations. >> thank you for the generous introduction and for t
Search Results 0 to 9 of about 10